Front Yard Curb Appeal

I received some questions about my front yard curb appeal comments in the article about adding curb appeal from the other day. Specifically, what did I mean about people having brown lawns in the Western states. Let me take a minute to explain a little further.

Front Yard Curb Appeal

Naturally, a lush green lawn is going to look a heck of a lot more attractive to buyers shopping for a new home. But in many Western states, we don’t get much summer rain. Not enough to keep the grass green. We also face expensive water bills, water shortages at times, and definitely a high awareness of water usage/conservation.

In many neighborhoods you’ll see that people allow the front yard to start turning toward brownish by the time mid-summer rolls around. Water bills are expensive, and aside from the expense, many folks just don’t see the lawn as a very worthwhile use of water.

I say this as someone who has lived in different parts of Colorado, California, and Oregon. Here in Portland, we haven’t experienced water shortages but lawn alternatives are still quite common. Many people would rather have ground covers and gardens with low water requirements instead of grass. A neighbor of mine went as far as to convert the front lawn to bark chips not too long ago. (I think it’s safe to say the home has lost some front yard curb appeal points, although some buyers will definitely love the low maintenance.)

The bottom line is if you do have a lawn then you’re much better off in terms of curb appeal if you go ahead and water it regularly so that it turns green. That’s why around here, one of the tell-tale signs of someone getting ready to list their house is when they suddenly become very diligent about watering the front lawn every evening. (Another sign is of course when the POD shows up.)

For quick fixes of smaller brown spots, you can opt for green grass paint.